Why is zoom video stock down today – none:. Zoom Consolidates Pandemic Gains

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After adjusting for stock-based compensation expense and related payroll taxes, and acquisition-related expenses, non-GAAP income from. Non-GAAP net income for the first quarter was $ million, after adjusting for stock-based compensation expense and related payroll.
 
 

 

Why Zoom Video Communications Stock Fell Today | The Motley Fool.Zoom share price decline steepens as revenue growth shrinks | S&P Global Market Intelligence

 
After adjusting for stock-based compensation expense and related payroll taxes, and acquisition-related expenses, non-GAAP income from. Non-GAAP net income for the first quarter was $ million, after adjusting for stock-based compensation expense and related payroll.

 
 

ZM – Zoom Video Communications Inc Stock Price Quote – NASDAQ | Morningstar

 
 

CEO Eric Yuan penned a blog post to address the mounting criticism. Usage of Zoom’s video-calling platform has skyrocketed amid the COVID pandemic, with Yuan noting that Zoom reached million daily meeting participants in March including both free and paid users. With that soaring usage, malicious actors have been increasingly hijacking video conferences in what is now being referred to as “Zoombombing. The chief executive outlined steps that the tech company is taking to improve privacy and security.

Zoom is immediately freezing all feature releases in order to allow its engineering teams to focus on existing issues, and conducting a comprehensive review to better understand all security problems associated with “new consumer use cases.

Zoom will also enhance its current bug bounty program and prepare a transparency report. Yuan will begin hosting weekly webinars focused specifically on privacy and security updates. Cost basis and return based on previous market day close. Calculated by average return of all stock recommendations since inception of the Stock Advisor service in February of Discounted offers are only available to new members.

Calculated by Time-Weighted Return since Volatility profiles based on trailing-three-year calculations of the standard deviation of service investment returns. Invest better with The Motley Fool. Get stock recommendations, portfolio guidance, and more from The Motley Fool’s premium services. Premium Services. Stock Advisor. Nevertheless, Kohl’s is a better operation than J.

Penney, certainly hasn’t gone through quite the disruptions that J. Penney has, but you know, keep in mind, this is more shoring up the floor than exploring the ceiling. Hill: No. But it’s absolutely something they need to do.

And it reminded me a little bit of the partnership they struck with Amazon , I’m talking about Kohl’s, of course, to provide returns within Kohl’s locations. This gives people one more reason to actually go into a Kohl’s. Kohl’s does curbside pickup, I don’t see them promoting it in the same way that we’ve seen Target and Walmart , but those two businesses have certainly provided a blueprint for what Kohl’s could be in the future. I don’t know. I’m not buying shares of Kohl’s, but I don’t think it’s unreasonable that the stock is up today in the way that it is.

So, even though it was losing on the margins, it was buying back shares and keeping that earnings per share story reasonably consistent.

It’s not going to suffer quite as much as your J. Penney, Sears , highly mall-based stores like this, but it’s still an uphill battle against Amazon. It’s improved the online experience, but it’s got a long way to go. Hill: Our email address is MarketFoolery Fool. Question from Sean Bryan in Harrisville, Utah, who writes, “I think there may come a time when people will look back and wonder how we justified eating animal meat, at least in the amounts that we do now?

If the War on Cash is followed by a “War on Meat,” what are the first three stocks you would put in that basket? It’s an interesting thought exercise, the obvious first stock is probably Beyond Meat , and if Impossible Foods goes public, they’re in there as well. Barker: Yeah, I guess it would depend, you know, if the war is being waged against the meat processors, right.

You want to stay pretty far away from Smithfield, for instance, which is now owned by China. But I think, obviously the Beyond Meats of the world are where you would, kind of, start with that. Is poultry being taken out too in this example? By the way, I’m totally willing to entertain the notion that meat consumption is going to suffer as people become, one, they’ve got more opportunities to get a meat-like taste from the Beyond Meats, but, you know, an increased exposure to the story of factory farms and things like that, I could certainly see society turning its back and looking back on our generation and how much meat we eat and how we produce it as being something that is fairly horrifying to the future generations.

Hill: Well, to answer your question, Sean writes “eating animal meat,” chickens are animals, so, yeah, I guess [laughs] poultry is part of that as well. Barker: Yeah. Whereas poultry often, and has picked up from peoples moving away for purely health reasons, away from red meat, boy!

Barker: Yeah, I do think these are trends that need to be considered. And I think Tyson Foods is one of those things that I wouldn’t put all of my money into or Hormel or any of those. Hill: I also think it’s a trend that needs to be considered, I don’t think, for investors, this is as lucrative a trend, both, in the near-term or even in the long-term, as the War on Cash.

And likely to be a much bloodier war too. I mean, beef and the production of it are about as central to the iconography of the American experience as you can get. If you’re like me, the fact that you have never driven a herd of cattle to the slaughterhouse, it’s probably something that you consider a failure at a certain level, as an American man. Don’t you feel at some level, like, you’re supposed to have done that by now?

It may not be a level you could even put words into; I see you struggling, but you know what I’m talking about. Hill: I think you’re talking about the movie City Slickers , which is the only passing thought I ever had of like, I wonder what that would be like. And then by the end of the movie, I thought, well, that was a fun movie, but, no, I’m not interested in doing that.

Barker: No, no, no, not as a vacation, as a, you know, you’ve got to do this or the ranch is going to have to be sold, like this level of being tied to the land and the animals and the production of your own food and all that, in a way that — look, you’re a big movie fan, you’ve watched your fair share of westerns, I mean, I’m not talking City Slickers level.

Hill: Yeah, my fair share of westerns is probably smaller than other people’s fair share of westerns. Barker: But you know, that this is laced into the American psyche. And if you’re going to take beef away, boy!

Hill: Well! And to go back to the War on Cash, how much resistance is cash putting up? Is the U. Treasury [laughs] really Treasury Department? I’m going to say, no. Whereas to your point, yeah, the beef industry, the poultry industry, yeah, they’re going to put up a fight. Hill: Great commercial. And the fact that you have them voiced by people like Sam Elliott and Robert Mitchum, I mean, two of the all-time great voices. So, yeah, those are — you know, again, [laughs] the U.

Treasury Department is not running second commercials on television or second pre-roll ads on YouTube to be, like, “Cash. It’s What’s In Your Wallet” like, no, they’re not doing that. Barker: Right. And even if you saw that, even if they produced a great commercial, you probably wouldn’t get misty-eyed for — oh, God!

Those were the days. Just wouldn’t happen. Whereas you watch that commercial and you’re like, I’ll tell you what I’m having for dinner, beef. Hill: [laughs] Because it’s what’s for dinner. It’s December 1st, it is the beginning. If you had just started listening to MarketFoolery in the past six months or so, you’re not aware of what we’ve been doing every year since , which is, Producer Dan Boyd and I are on a mission to improve the menu of holiday music here in America as stations flip to all-holiday formats and play the same 50 songs.

Starting in , me and Dan Boyd, and it’s mostly Dan because he’s got the music expertise and depth of knowledge for all kinds of great holiday music that never makes it to the radio airwaves. So, that’s what you’re going to hear this month.

In lieu of our normal closing music, you’re going to hear a different holiday song every day. I’ll probably be watching, I will not be live tweeting, because I feel like I’ve done that enough and there’s no need to go down that road. But you had mentioned to me that you had an idea for a Christmas movie that you wanted to pitch me.

Barker: First of all, on the live tweeting, because you did it a few times, couldn’t you just go back and get those tweets and sync to the airing of the show for those that didn’t get to experience the live tweet with you back in the day?

It was only, like, two years ago was your last one, or three, I think two. Hill: Yeah, I don’t know. I feel like it’s just like, oh, here’s this thing Barker: Yeah, people bump up tweets all the time.

Yeah, I’m not pitching you a movie, it’s more of a show. And you can point out here, whereas you won’t be live tweeting it, you do every year in hopes that some Hollywood producers out there try to pitch your idea of the Yukon Cornelius backstory Hill: Yeah, the origin story of Yukon Cornelius. He’s young, fresh-faced, wide-eyed and it’s a gritty live action series. Look, this is a beloved children’s special and [laughs] Yukon Cornelius is brandishing multiple weapons in it.

I mean, the guy is packing a gun, he’s got a whip. He’s got skills, he’s got survival skills, he’s got some kind of an axe, like, a hand axe. So, there is absolutely a Netflix — I mean, you saw the money that Quibi was throwing at shows that were awful. Put some money behind this idea, people. And, you know, I don’t need the money, just take the idea and run with it, I just want to watch it. Barker: He’s redheaded, and he’s a little bit dangerously violent at times. You could see him developing in the Yukon Cornelius.

Barker: So, queuing of Rudolph , as you know, because you’ve studied it so much in the show, like, Santa is a little bit off his game in that one. He’s kind of a mean Santa in Rudolph , I think he needs a break. And the fact is he’s not working that hard the rest of the year.